GET THE STORY

SEE NASCAR® TEAM OWNER AND DRIVER MICHAEL WALTRIP’S STORY.

GET THE STORY

On or off the track, you can’t always see danger around the corner.

You may be surprised how many people have atrial fibrillation (AFib) – people like the mother of NASCAR® team owner and driver Michael Waltrip. See how it affected their family, and learn how you can protect yourself and your loved ones from the danger of AFib-related stroke.

LEARN MORE

Get more facts about AFib-related stroke.

 
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~2.7

million Americans have AFib

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AFib (atrial fibrillation) is more common than you might think. It’s a type of irregular heartbeat, and it can cause blood to pool in the upper chambers of the heart. Some people with AFib will never experience symptoms.
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~1/3

of people with AFib will suffer a stroke

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With AFib, the heart's upper chambers don't pump all their blood into the lower chambers. The blood that's left behind can pool and form a clot. If part of this clot breaks off, it can travel to the brain and cause a stroke.
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5x

The increased risk of stroke for people with AFib

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Since AFib patients have an increased risk, stroke prevention measures are very important. Anticoagulants, known as blood thinners, help prevent clots from forming and are an effective way to reduce the risk of a stroke.

TELL YOUR STORY

What’s your AFib story?

You’ve heard Michael Waltrip’s AFib story. Now share your own. Your experiences can teach and inspire others whose lives are affected by AFib.

SUPPORT THE CAUSE

Thank you for helping us cross the finish line.

Here it is - the MyAFibStory.com car that raced at Talladega on October 19th. You and your photos helped make this is a possibility, and more. Not only did you help spread the word about AFib, with each photo we made a contribution to the American Heart Association (AHA) to make a difference for the millions of Americans living with AFib. Thanks for all your help.

For more information about AHA's mission of buliding healthier lives, free from cardiovascular diseases and stroke, visit the American Heart Association of heart.org

SUPPORT THE CAUSE